One more time.  Salem has NO ROCK BOTTOM !! It sits an Artificial Island”

NRC has not denied my testimony, PSE&G has not denied it, New Jersey officials have not denied it, legislators have not denied it, and nobody cares.

 

The Niigata Earthquake resulted in dramatic damage due to liquefaction of the sand deposits in the low-lying areas of Niigata City.

 

On June 16, 1964, Niigata was subjected to a magnitude 7.5 earthquake. Although the buildings had been designed and constructed to withstand the violent shaking, something unanticipated happened: the soils beneath the foundations turned to "quicksand". These reinforced concrete buildings sank into the earth and tilted like ships listing in heavy seas.   Ok, quicksand, I always called it jello  

 

Civil and geotechnical engineers around the world immediately became aware of potential earthquake-induced ground failures that were rarely considered before in design.

http://www.ellingtoncross.com/liquefaction/liquefaction-mitigation-systems-ground-improvement-soil-stabilization-geotechnical-engineers.htm  

Salem began operating in 1979

License expires, Unit 1: August 13, 2016. Unit 2: April 18, 2020 Already PSE&G is requesting license  extension  for another    20 years

Creek came on line in 1986

They should be shut down and  dismantled

 

Excerpts From "The REAL Dirt on Liquefaction"

The Port of Oakland handles 95% of the container cargo that travels under the Golden Gate Bridge, as well as some break-bulk, bulk liquid, and bulk dry cargo (personal comm., G. Joseph, Port of Oakland, September 2000). Damage to port facilities in 1989 was due primarily to liquefaction of the hydraulic fill………note

due to liquefaction

Still not a nuclear power plant complex

 

The Port of Kobe, Japan is one of the largest in the world, and handles over ten times the cargo of Oakland. Kobe's port suffered major damage as a result of the 1995 Kobe (Hyogo-Ken Nanbu) earthquake. The three main facilities consisted of perimeter quay walls filled with granular hydraulic fill on sea-bottom clay. As a result of the earthquake, large sections of wharf and warehousing areas sank and were covered with water…..Due to liquefaction

.

Civil and geotechnical engineers around the world immediately became aware of potential earthquake-induced ground failures that were rarely considered before in design.

http://www.ellingtoncross.com/liquefaction/liquefaction-mitigation-systems-ground-improvement-soil-stabilization-geotechnical-engineers.htm  

 

California

 Artificial spill deposits    (Like the dredge spoils from the Delaware River which built the Island)

 on the east side of San Francisco Bay underwent moderate to severe levels of soil liquefaction during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Typical of all these sites, which represent occurrences of liquefaction-induced damage farthest from the rupture zone, are low cone-penetration-test (CPT) and standard-penetration-test (SPT) resistances in zones of cohesion less silty and sandy hydraulic fill

 

Does anybody care?